HSV-2, which is usually genital herpes, can also spread to the oral region, but it’s not as likely

However, both types can recur and spread even when no symptoms are present. HSV-1 is usually mild, especially when it infects the lips, face, or genitals. It is the most common cause of neonatal herpes, a rare but dangerous infection in newborns; however, type 1 causes up to one-third of neonatal infections. It’s also the reason that both HSV-1 and 2 can pose serious challenges for infants, who have a limited immune response; and for people with compromised immune systems, including people with cancer, AIDS, severe burns, and people taking immunosuppressant medications. HSV-1 is typically spread by contact with infected saliva, while HSV-2 is usually spread sexually or via the mother’s genital tract to her newborn baby. HSV-1 more commonly affects the area around the mouth, while HSV-2 is more likely to affected the genital area, but both viruses can affect either region. The virus can remain latent (no symptoms) for years, but can also become reactivated during periods of illness, emotional stress, trauma, or other triggers, such as sunlight and menstruation. As in oral herpes, each outbreak starts with a feeling of pain or burning at the site, followed by a localized patch of vesicles that can be very painful. HSV-2 is usually the cause of genital herpes, although HSV-1 sometimes causes genital infections. Oral herpes is most often contracted through kissing someone with a cold sore. Herpes can be transmitted even with no symptoms present. Also, HIV may be more infectious and likely to be transmitted in someone who has both HIV and HSV.

HSV-2, which is usually genital herpes, can also spread to the oral region, but it's not as likely 2However, the herpes virus has mostly cosmetic ramifications. In fact, studies show that genital HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections are most common among individuals who do not have either type of HSV infection at the time of exposure. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is the most common cause of genital herpes, but it can also cause oral herpes. However, genital herpes can also be transmitted when there are no visible symptoms. But the infection can also develop from contact with an infected partner who does not have visible sores or other symptoms. Transmission of Oral Herpes: Oral herpes is usually caused by HSV-1. Cold sores usually occur on the face, particularly around the mouth and nose, but they can pop up anywhere on the skin or mucous membranes. Although the HSV-1 virus occasionally causes blisters in the genital area, it is usually HSV-2, also known as genital herpes, that causes sores on the penis in sexually active males and on the vulva, vagina, and cervix in sexually active females. HSV-2 does not spread from toilet seats or hot tubs.

HSV can also cause more severe generalised infections amongst those with weakened immunity. Genital herpes can be spread by vaginal, oral or anal sex. HSV2. HSV1 more commonly occurs around the mouth, but it can also occur on the genitals. There is no cure for genital herpes, but medication can help manage and reduce the severity of symptoms, and also reduce the frequency of recurrences. Infections caused by HSV1 are less likely to recur in the genital area than infections caused by HSV2. Could you mistakenly give your partner genital herpes? Likewise, if HSV-2 comes into contact with your mouth, you can get cold sores (although this scenario is less likely because HSV-2 is more fastidious about where it lives). In fact, you’re most likely to spread the virus to your sexual partner in the first few days when the blisters are forming. Oral herpes (cold sores) is USUALLY HSV Type I, but not always.

Cold Sores

Two types of herpes simplex virus infections can cause genital herpes:. This is the type that usually causes cold sores or fever blisters around your mouth, though it can be spread to your genital area during oral sex. HSV-2. This is the type that commonly causes genital herpes. The virus spreads through sexual contact and skin-to-skin contact. HSV-2 is very common and highly contagious, whether or not you have an open sore. Can I pass the virus to a partner if I have no symptoms? Herpes simplex on the genitals may be type 1 or type 2. Others catch it but show no symptoms. There is also a slight possibility that virus may be transmitted through asymptomatic shedding which can occur between outbreaks. Also, cold sores on the face may be caught from someone with genital herpes through oral sex.

Genital Herpes Causes