1) Can HSV 2 transmit from genital to other parts of body

1) Can HSV 2 transmit from genital to other parts of body 1

Type 2 rarely causes complications or spreads to other parts of the body. Herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. It is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV-2 is commonly found in the genital area, but it can be passed to the mouth through oral sex. HSV can be passed to other parts of the body during this time. I am a virgin and she has only had sex with one other guy and been intimate with another so surely the chance of us having HSV 2 is less likely given that in the vast majority of cases HSV 2 affects and is transmitted by the genitals. Likewise, HSV2 can enter the body near, or in, the mouth and cause oral-facial herpes.

1) Can HSV 2 transmit from genital to other parts of body 2The viruses are called herpes simplex type 1 and herpes simplex type 2. Herpes symptoms can occur in both male and female genital areas that are covered by a latex condom. If you touch your sores or the fluids from the sores, you may transfer herpes to another part of your body, such as your eyes. Genital herpes is an infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. There are two types of herpes simplex viruses: herpes simplex type I and herpes simplex type II. One of the biggest problems in diagnosing genital herpes is test sensitivity. There are a number of reasons why cultures can be negative, one being that the disease may be caused by something other than herpes. Genital herpes can be caused by both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Either type of herpes virus can invade both oral genital areas of the body. In other words, genital HSV-1 can be spread through genital sex, even when there are no symptoms.

Sometimes it can cause more serious infections in other parts of the body. Oral herpes is easily spread by direct exposure to saliva or even from droplets in breath. HSV-2 genital infection is more likely to cause recurrences than HSV-1. Genital herpes is an infection caused by either the Type 1 (HSV-1) or Type 2 (HSV-2) herpes simplex virus. However, if symptoms occur during the primary outbreak, they can be quite pronounced. It is possible to transfer the virus from the original site to another part of the body. Although the HSV-1 virus occasionally causes blisters in the genital area, it is usually HSV-2, also known as genital herpes, that causes sores on the penis in sexually active males and on the vulva, vagina, and cervix in sexually active females. HSV-2 occasionally produces sores on other parts of the body, such as the mouth or throat. People with either HSV-1 or HSV-2 can pass the virus to others even when they do not have an active herpes outbreak.

STD Facts

HSV-1 is typically spread by contact with infected saliva, while HSV-2 is usually spread sexually or via the mother’s genital tract to her newborn baby. The virus can remain latent (no symptoms) for years, but can also become reactivated during periods of illness, emotional stress, trauma, or other triggers, such as sunlight and menstruation. However, in people with poor immune systems, such as organ transplant recipients or people with HIV, the virus can spread throughout the body and cause severe disease, even of the brain. It can sometimes cause more serious infections in other parts of the body. HSV-1 can also cause genital herpes, which is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Infections are categorized based on the part of the body infected. Other disorders caused by herpes simplex include: herpetic whitlow when it involves the fingers, 4 herpes of the eye, 5 herpes infection of the brain, 6 and neonatal herpes when it affects a newborn, among others. Genital herpes is classified as a sexually transmitted infection. If an oral HSV-1 infection is contracted first, seroconversion will have occurred after 6 weeks to provide protective antibodies against a future genital HSV-1 infection. The herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes oral herpes; both HSV-1 and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) cause genital herpes. In a very small number of cases, herpes can spread to other organs, including the eyes, the throat, the lungs, and the brain. It cannot be used to treat or prevent HSV disease of other parts of the body. One in five adults in the US is believed to be infected with genital herpes. Occasionally sores can appear on other parts of the body where broken skin has come into contact with the virus. Transmission is most likely when a sore or other symptoms of infection are present. Learn about genital herpes, a sexually transmitted disease (STD), in this ACOG patient FAQ. The herpes virus passes through your skin (1). Besides the sex organs, genital herpes can affect the tongue, mouth, eyes, gums, lips, fingers, and other parts of the body. You even can reinfect yourself if you touch a sore and then rub or scratch another part of your body, especially your eyes.

Herpes Simplex